• Bilston Enamel Patch Box - circa 1780 - Private Collection.

    This item is from the collection of Number 1 Royal Crescent Museum in Bath. At the end of the eighteenth century it was popular to wear small patches made of black taffeta for those who had nothing to hide as well. A whole ‘patch’ language developed.

    Mini card size: Approx. 90mm wide x 65mm high.

    Bilston Enamel Patch Box

    Mini Card
    Code: MC157 £4.20 Add to order
  • Bilston Enamel Patch Box - circa 1780 - Private Collection.

    This item is from the collection of Number 1 Royal Crescent Museum in Bath.

    At the end of the eighteenth century it was popular to wear small patches made of black taffeta for those who had nothing to hide as well. A whole ‘patch’ language developed.

    Tag size: Approx. 90mm wide x 65mm high.

    Bilston Enamel Patch Box

    Gift Tag
    Code: T157 £2.16 Add to order
  • Georgian Bonbonniere, Patch & Snuff Enamel Boxes (1780 - 1830) Michael Longmore, Gray's Antique Centre, London & Private Collections.

    These little enamel boxes have painted scenes and would have been given as love tokens or gifts from travels around the country. ‘A Trifle from York’ or a ‘A Present from Liverpool’ would have been bought as a present or momento. Some of the boxes have short mottos written on the lids defining love and friendship. One states ‘This am I the Giver Are Thine for Ever’ another warns ‘Forget not an Old Friend & be choice of a new one’.

    The Bonbonnieres would contain sweetmeats,

    Georgian Bonbonniere, Patch & Snuff Enamel Boxes

    Wrapping Paper
    Code: WP183 £10.08 Add to order
  • Items which may have been found on a Georgian Lady's Dressing Table - Private Collection & Number 1 Royal Cresent, Bath

    Georgian Lady's Dressing Table

    Greetings Card
    Code: C174 £10.08
  • Items Which May Have Been Found on a Georgian Lady’s Dressing Table.

    These items are nearly all in the collection of Number 1 Royal Crescent Museum in Bath. A fan depicting a map of Bath, a pair of rare Bilston Enamel Candlesticks circa 1780 and silver tweezers in a red leather case are some of the exhibits in the lady’s bedroom at the museum. A tiny glass patch dish circa 1750 would have held patches for a lady’s face.

    Patches were worn to cover blemishes from small pox and skin complaints. At the end of the eighteenth century it was popular to wear small patches made of black taffeta for those who had nothing to hide as well. A whole ‘patch’ language developed. Items not to scale.

    Georgian Lady’s Dressing Table

    Wrapping Paper
    Code: WP157 £10.08 Add to order